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Downs avoids DL, but Halos add an arm

Downs avoids DL, but Halos add an arm

Downs avoids DL, but Halos add an arm
NEW YORK -- Lefty Scott Downs, a critical cog in the Angels' struggling bullpen, is expected to avoid a trip to the disabled list despite getting spiked in the right ankle on Thursday.

Angels general manager Jerry Dipoto, who revealed the news prior to Friday's series-opening 5-0 loss to the Yankees in the Bronx, doesn't know when Downs will be available to pitch, but postgame X-rays on Thursday and an MRI exam in New York on Friday revealed no structural damage or ligament damage, making him day to day.

For now, at least.

"The initial prognosis of a bruise, or a contusion, was correct," Dipoto said. "I know he left yesterday's game on crutches and was on them again this morning, but right now, it's viewed as day to day."

Downs injured his ankle at Target Field in Thursday's seventh inning, when Twins center fielder Denard Span stepped on it while crossing the bag for what ended up being the tying run. Downs iced the ankle constantly, was off crutches by Friday morning and described the injury as just a stretching of the capsule that sits on top his ankle.

He hopes to test it on Saturday.

"It's still sore," said Downs, who has posted a 2.17 ERA while averaging 64 appearances per season over the last five years. "It's going to be sore for a while. It's just about what I can tolerate."

With Downs ailing, the Angels called up right-hander David Carpenter from Triple-A Salt Lake while optioning utility man Alexi Amarista. Carpenter, who relies on a sinker-slider combination, was selected by the Angels in the ninth round of the 2009 First-Year Player Draft and spent the previous three seasons in their system, posting a 0.57 ERA in 44 appearances for Class A Advanced Inland Empire and Double-A Arkansas in 2011.

On Friday, the 24-year-old made his Major League debut, giving up just one hit in a scoreless eighth inning.

"I always thought about what kind of emotions I'd feel once I get that call -- cry, scream -- and when it finally happened, it was just pure shock, actually," Carpenter said of his first callup prior to the game. "I just kind of sat there with an expressionless face."

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