Red-hot Calhoun comes up short in bid for cycle

Halos' leadoff hitter gets single, double, triple by third, but can't go deep

Red-hot Calhoun comes up short in bid for cycle

ARLINGTON -- After two innings, Kole Calhoun was halfway to a cycle with a triple and a double against Rangers veteran Colby Lewis. Calhoun's single in the third left him one big swing away.

Was he thinking about the cycle?

"One hundred percent," Calhoun said, grinning.

The Angels' leadoff catalyst felt he had a pitch to drive in the fifth against Roman Mendez, the Rangers' young reliever.

"I had a pretty good pitch to do it on, the one I grounded out to first base," Calhoun said. "I put a pretty good swing on it, but it didn't happen."

In his final at-bat, in the eighth, Calhoun slammed his fourth hit of the night, scoring his fourth run in the Angels' 15-6 victory Thursday night.

"I don't think I've ever had one -- even when I was younger," Calhoun said of the cycle. "I've never pulled it off."

Babe Ruth and Hank Aaron never had one. Neither did Willie Mays nor his godson, Barry Bonds. Cycles are not common. The all-time record for a career is three (Bob Meusel, Babe Herman and John Reilly).

"In the third inning," Calhoun said, "Trout goes, 'We're gonna get four more [at-bats]. I said, 'All right.'"

Trout, who had a homer and three singles, said he was "pulling for it," adding, "Kole was telling me he was trying to do it."

Manager Mike Scioscia also was pulling for his right fielder to make it happen.

"He got most of the hard part out of the way early," Scioscia said, "with the triple. Kole had good at-bats all the way through."

Calhoun, raising his season slash line to .305/.366/.542, is making it difficult for Scioscia to go with a platoon and play Collin Cowgill against lefties.

Calhoun is as hot as the Lone Star State weather. Over his past 35 games, he's batting .371, and he has scored 36 runs -- more than any player in the Majors -- since May 29.

Calhoun seemed more pleased with Hector Santiago's successful bid for his first win after seven losses than his own work with the stick.

"The big thing was with a guy like Santiago, we gave him a cushion to relax," Calhoun said. "He's pitched some big ballgames for us. It's nice to let him settle in and come out with his first win."

Lyle Spencer is a columnist for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.